Watch the Reaction of Black People on Facebook about The Makeup Artist Who Inadvertently Botches a Black Woman’s Face!

Watch the Reaction of Black People on Facebook about The Makeup Artist Who Inadvertently Botches a Black Woman’s Face!

Make up is a big part of today’s culture. From the red carpet premieres to the everyday wear that many women use, foundation, concealer, mascara and other products are at the forefront. However, when it comes to the products that are skin tone matched, women who don’t fall into the vaguely tan to ivory shades have a rough time finding matching colors.

A recent trend tutorial highlighted this problem, and another as well. BuzzFeed released a clown contouring video with three volunteers: two typical, well catered to skin toned women and one woman whose skin color was more chocolate colored than tan. The make up artist, while trying to do something good since tutorials like that often feature only the well catered to skin colors, made the mistake of not making sure the foundation matched the third volunteer’s skin color. She came out with a noticeable difference between her face and her neck. While she didn’t seem to mind, social media did.

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While it highlighted the issue of few cosmetics being readily available for darker skin tones, it highlighted the issue of make up artists not being prepared to work with darker skin.

The problem goes further than internet based entertainment tutorial videos. Nykhor Paul – a Sudanese refugee turned world renown model – has to bring her own make up to high end fashion events. Anything that can be named – New York Fashion Week, Paris Fashion Week, etc. – that she attends worldwide, she needs her own make up.

She took to her social media followers to express her frustration. Essentially calling out that the make up artists pigeonhole women with darker skin tones to having to develop the skills by themselves, for themselves, Paul doesn’t want an apology. She expects to see the make up artists step up their game and learn how to accommodate darker skin tones.

Another model that has faced and voiced her concerns is Jourdan Dunn. She revealed that not only do modeling agencies turn her away because they feel they have enough models of darker skin colors, one make up artist straight up refused to do her make up. The reason?

The reason was because she was a darker skin tone. It was later described as pure racism. She vented by going to her social media as well, simply saying that some make up artists needed to learn how to do make up and hair for those of darker skin tones.

Believe it or not, however, there are being steps taken to change this. Many many brands now cater to the darker skin tones that used to be impossible to find make up for. Models and other women with skin that is darker are standing up for themselves.

Since it is the women with darker tones that seem to spend more money on make up and hair products (after all, they have to buy more expensive products since the cheap brands don’t have their tones), doesn’t it make sense to carry their tones? Or is the beauty industry too focused on catering to a minority and ignoring the money of those that aren’t seen in the industry as conventionally beautiful?

www.theroot.com mashable.com www.huffingtonpost.com

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